Wayne State University

Aim Higher

National and Local Coverage

Cheryl Deep manages media relations and publications for the Institute of Gerontology. To interview faculty, pursue a news tip or learn more about what we do, contact her at 313-664-2607 or cheryldeep@wayne.edu.

Read Transitions,the IOG's newsletter about research and education on successful aging.

See the complete biannual IOG Report 2012-2013.


2014 Coverage


CBS Detroit, 1/22/14

Study says experience, not age, is why our brains slow down

By Sean Lee

Getting older is usually associated with losing brain power — but a new study says that may not be the case. The study, out of Germany, argues that older brains may just take longer to process ever-increasing amounts of knowledge, and that’s been mistaken for declining capacity. Think about your brain like a brand new computer … It’s really fast, right? But as your hard drive accumulates more files, your P.C. starts to slow down. Wayne State University Gerontology researcher Peter Lichtenberg says it’s a valid analogy. “If you’ve acquired information about 6,000 birthdays over your lifetime and you’re having a little bit of trouble remembering whose is which, and you only get maybe 75 percent accuracy,” said Lichtenberg, “is that really worse than somebody who’s acquired maybe 100 birthdays and gets 90 percent accuracy because there’s less?” Lichtenberg agrees with the study’s authors who say, most standard cognitive testing methods are flawed, which can confuse increased knowledge with declining capacity. The study has been published in the journal Topics in Cognitive Science.


2013 Coverage


Crain’s Detroit Business, 12/26/13

$40M retirement community coming to Bloomfield Hills

By Bridget Vis

A $40 million continuing care retirement community is coming to Bloomfield Hills. The groundbreaking for Cedarbrook of Bloomfield Hills, on Woodward Avenue north of Opdyke Road, happened earlier this month, and the facility is scheduled to open in September 2015, said Michael J. Damone, president of Cedarbrook Senior Living LLC. Damone said that Cedarbrook will also work with Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology to be a resource for residents and their families.


Detroit Jewish News, Oct. 17-23/13

Fight elder fraud

By Ronelle Grier

Peter Lichtenberg, geriatric neuropsychologist and director of Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology, commented in a story about elder fraud, the financial exploitation of the elderly. The mental and emotional state of an elderly person can play a part in whether he or she becomes a victim of fraud, according to Lichtenberg, who recently served as a panelist during the screening of a documentary film titled “Last Will and Embezzlement.” According to a five-year study he worked on, risk factors include psychological vulnerability, depression and dissatisfaction with one’s role in society. Lichtenberg developed an assessment tool that helps determine older adults’ vulnerability to fraud and their ability to manage their money; it’s called the “Financial Decision-Making Rating Scale.” (Subscriber access only)


WDET-FM, 10/17/13

Lack of mobility is a key factor in isolation within the aging population

By Martina Guzman

WDET’s Martina Guzman explored the challenges facing seniors as they face reduced mobility and independence. Lack of mobility is one of the key factors in isolation within the aging population. Seclusion puts older adults at greater risk for developing depression. According to the Center for disease control, the 65 and older population accounts for 15 percent of the nation’s suicides, the highest rate among any age group. But if staying active can be a challenge for young people, it’s especially challenging if you’re older, have body aches or a debilitating illnesses. Cathy Lysack, deputy director of the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University, says seniors have to keep moving no matter how old they are. “Most older adults think, ‘oh, I’m too weak, it’s bad for me.’ The opposite is true, even women with significant arthritis will benefit with less fatigue and less pain if they exercise. Lysack says that failing to exercise or avoiding exercise not only affects seniors physically it also affects their ability to think clearly or rationally. “You may not be able to drive a car, it’s a complex skill. And when that happens your social environment shrinks very quickly. If you don’t have the resources and people to offset that, you’re at risk for isolation socially and that’s bad for older people.”


Northville Patch, 10/16

Annual Fall Conference

On Tuesday, Nov. 5, caregivers, students and health professionals gather for the Annual Fall 5CE Conference, “A Meaningful Life with Alzheimer’s disease” at the Vista Tech Center at Schoolcraft Community College. The conference is presented by the Alzheimer's Association - Greater Michigan Chapter and Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology.

http://northville.patch.com/groups/events/p/annual-fall-conference


Detroit Free Press, 10/13/13

146,000 Michiganders - at least - face loss of cheap policies under new health care reform rules

By Robin Erb

At least 146,000 Michiganders — and possibly thousands more — with health coverage purchased directly from insurers now are learning their polices will end Dec. 31 because they don’t meet the minimum requirements of the federal health care act. Under the law, each policy must cover essential benefits in 10 categories. Instead of beefing up these policies, insurers are opting to drop them, advising consumers to consider other policies that are now available either from the insurers directly or through the Michigan Health Insurance Marketplace, also known as the state exchange. The policies that are ending were often less expensive on the individual market because they provided limited benefits and were sold to healthier consumers. Customers will pay more, but they also will get more coverage now, noted Gail Jensen Summers, an economics professor at Wayne State University, who specializes in health insurance policy and costs.


USA Today, 10/7

Take active role when choosing a new doctor

By Zlati Meyer

Americans are going to medical specialists more and more. According to a recent national study in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, the probability of receiving a referral during a doctor’s visit increased from 4.8 percent to 9.3 percent between 1999-2009. Wayne State University health economist Gail Jensen Summers said the increase stems from the growing number of managed-care plans that have replaced self-referrals, with the primary care physician serving as a gatekeeper for efficiency and cost savings. She also noted physician group practices are expanding to include auxiliary services like labs and physical therapy, and many have medical specialists on staff.


WDET-FM, 9/26

Taking advantage of elders

One out of every 20 seniors are now facing the challenge of dealing with financial exploitation. Victims lose anywhere from $79,000 to $186,000 or more. Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University, will discuss his findings Sept. 30, at the Berman Center for the Performing Arts. During the event, experts will analyze the multiple ways older adults are exploited, and a documentary film titled “Last Will and Embezzlement," will be show featuring Hollywood star Mickey Rooney.


Oakland Press, 9/28

Five ways to sharpen your brain

Improving brain health to stop memory loss is a key concern of older adults, but many do not know the best way to strengthen their mind. Health Alliance Plan (HAP) has been educating its members at Sharpen Your Brain workshops offering simple exercises to stimulate brain growth. The workshops are run by a team from the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University, Donna MacDonald, the institute’s director of outreach and educational programs, and Cheryl Deep, who directs media relations and communications. They developed their popular brain training workshops, also known as Brain Neurobics in conjunction with WSU and other cognitive neuroscience researchers. Now they are sharing some of their top tricks to stimulate the brain.


Detroit Free Press, USA Today, 9/23

Protecting seniors and their money is focus of daughter's documentary

USA Today

By Cassandra Spratling

An article highlights a documentary film, Last Will and Embezzlement, which aims to raise awareness about financial exploitation of elderly people. One out of every 20 older adults in the U.S. will be a victim of financial exploitation, and the rates are rising, said Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University. To help, he is developing an assessment to determine whether a senior citizen is at risk of being the victim of financial abuse. He said he hopes to be able to pilot the 61-question assessment by the end of the year.


Detroit Legal News, 9/18/13

Film highlights alarming rise of financial abuse of older adults

One out of every 20 older adults in the U.S. will be a victim of financial exploitation this year, and the rates are rising. Prevention is the best defense against this exploding problem. But first we must pinpoint who is most at risk. Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University, has created the Lichtenberg Financial Decision-Making Rating Scale to do just that. Initial studies confirm the scale as a reliable tool in determining older adults’ vulnerability to fraud and ability to manage their money. “We aren’t trying to usurp a person’s independence,” Lichtenberg said. “We want to balance autonomy with protection and determine how best to educate and support older adults most at risk of being exploited.” Lichtenberg will discuss his findings as part of the “Safeguarding the Golden Generation” panel and movie preview Sept. 30, from 6:30-9:30 pm at the Berman Center for the Performing Arts, in West Bloomfield. The evening analyzes the multiple ways older adults are exploited and kicks off with the screening of a documentary titled “Last Will and Embezzlement.” The film will also be shown on Sept. 25 at the Italian American Cultural Center in Clinton Township. Among the presenters are Jocelyn Benson, interim dean of Wayne State University’s Law School.


WWJ-AM, 9/16/13

Brain Neurobics

Donna MacDonald, community outreach and professional outreach director Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology (IOG), was interviewed by WWJ reporter Pat Sweeting about the Brain Neurobics program and how older adults can keep their memories sharp. The program is a partnership between the IOG and Health Alliance Plan.


WJBK Fox 2, 9/9/13

Brain Neurobics

Donna MacDonald, Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology, was interviewed by Fox 2 health reporter Deena Centofanti about the Brain Neurobics program and how older adults can keep their memories sharp. The month of September is “Healthy Aging Month.”


Observer & Eccentric, 7/26/13

Summers' splendor reaps rewards at lily show

Health economist by day, lily grower by night (and weekend), Wayne State professor Gail Jensen Summers divides her time between complex analysis of Medicare data, and coaxing delicate lilies into breath-taking, perfectly timed blooms. She won big on both fronts this year. Peer-reviewed economics journals published two of her papers this spring, and she won the Best Lily in Show award at the 66th North American International Lily Show in June.

http://www.hometownlife.com/article/20130728/NEWS02/307280058/Summers-splendor-reaps-rewards-lily-show


Healthier Black Elders Event Draws Hundreds of Engaged Seniors, 6/11/13


The Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), 5/26

New study, bill puts focus on senior fraud

By Diane C. Lade

New efforts are underway to combat what aging experts say has become one of the top threats facing elders: losing their savings to con artists and financial predators. Gerontologists at Wayne State University have created, for the first time, a potential victim profile that could alert professionals and families to which seniors are most psychologically vulnerable to fraud. And a bipartisan bill filed last week by U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, a Democrat from Boca Raton, and two other representatives would create a federal advisory office dedicated to protecting elders from fraud and ensuring victims' complaints are handled efficiently and quickly. Deutch's bill mandates that the Federal Trade Commission, which would house the new office, "immediately" funnel elder fraud and exploitation reports to appropriate local law enforcement or regulatory agencies for investigation, something the FTC is not required to do now. The new office also would alert elders to new scams and educate them about investment fraud. Peter Lichtenberg, director of Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology and the researcher behind the elder fraud victim profile, commented in the story.


Senior Planet 5/20/13

Scams: Are You Immune?

By Kathleen Doheny

Research into what makes older adults vulnerable to scams by IOG Director Peter Lichtenberg was the subject of an extensive interview.  Risk factors for seniors, tips on staying safe, and details of the 4,400 older adults (average age 66) studied were included.  Lichtenberg said that of the 5% who had been victimized, depression and not feeling socially fulfilled greatly increased the odds of falling prey to financial fraud.  People who don’t feel loved and appreciated are easy targets for charming thieves who know how to establish bonds and trust quickly. The article included a “Fraud Awareness Quiz.”


Prognosis News, 5/16/13

IOG  Researcher Chairs Major Symposium

Dr. Noa Ofen, an assistant professor in the MPSI and IOG Lifespan program and in the School of Medicine's Department of Pediatrics, received high honors in being selected to chair and speak at a major symposium at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry in San Francisco. Her symposium, "Memory Systems in Development, Risk and Disease: A Case Study for R-DoC Applications in the Schizophrenia Diathesis" was one of the few selected for presentation.

Dr. Ofen's research with children and adolescents seeks to understand learning and memory networks in the developing human brain, including vulnerability to schizophrenia.


Macomb County Legal News, 5/6/13

Honoring work on behalf of ‘vulnerable adults’

By Sheila Pursglove

Elder Law of Michigan has scheduled two events for the 5th Annual Joe D. Sutton Call to Justice Awards, honoring individuals and organizations that help adults in need and work towards health, safety, fairness and justice for vulnerable people. Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Institute of Gerontology and the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute at Wayne State University, will receive the Leadership Award. Lichtenberg is the founding director of the Wayne State University Lifespan Alliance. He also has written several books on aging and served as chair of the Michigan Dementia Coalition and president of the Adult Development and Aging Section of the American Psychological Association.


Newswise, 5/2

Wayne State researcher appointed adjunct foreign professor at prestigious Karolinska Institute

Mark R. Luborsky, director of aging and health disparities research in the Institute of Gerontology (IOG), and professor of anthropology and gerontology at Wayne State University, has been appointed adjunct foreign professor at the prestigious Nobel Prize-granting Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. The six-year appointment recognizes Luborsky for his many scientific achievements and long-standing research focus on life reorganization and continuity of meaning and function. "Mark is not only an exceptional scholar but a phenomenal colleague to all Institute of Gerontology faculty and students," said Peter Lichtenberg, director of the IOG. “Dr. Luborsky is most deserving of this recognition from the prestigious Karolinska Institute,” said Hilary Ratner, vice president for Research at Wayne State University. “His research targets ways to help people in the United States and all over the world. This collaboration with the Karolinska Institute will allow his research to have an even greater impact around the globe.”


The Deseret News, 4/30/13

Some Seniors More Vulnerable to Fraud

Research by IOG Director Peter Lichtenberg points to areas of increased vulnerability among seniors as loneliness and isolation motivate them to connect with strangers who are potential predators.


Detroit Legal News, 4/29

Elder Law of Michigan to host two “Call to Justice” award events in May

By Sheila Pursglove

Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Institute of Gerontology and the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute at Wayne State University, will receive the Leadership Award on Tuesday, May 7 at the Glen Oaks Country Club in Farmington Hills. Lichtenberg also is the founding director of the Wayne State University Lifespan Alliance, author of several books on aging and has held office in several professional organizations including Chair of Michigan Dementia Coalition and President of the Adult Development and Aging Section of the American Psychological Association.


More Data Needed for Better Care of Area Seniors, 4/10/13


CBS Detroit, Medical Xpress, News Medical, Examiner, 4/25/13

Wayne State finds ‘psychologically vulnerable’ more vulnerable to fraudsters

Older adults with the highest levels of depression and the lowest levels of social needs fulfillment experience higher levels of fraud, according to a new study from Wayne State University and the Illinois Institute of Technology. The schools advise clinical gerontologists in the field to be aware of older adults’ needs for assessment of financial exploitation or its potential when working with highly vulnerable individuals. Financial exploitation of the elderly is on the rise according to the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging, and the numbers are expected to continue to grow as Baby Boomers age. This exploitation, which includes telemarketing scams, fake home repairs, fake check scams, identity theft and more, costs approximately $3 billion each year. The study, “Is Psychological Vulnerability Related to the Experience of Fraud in Older Adults?” published in the recent issue of Clinical Gerontologist, is the first study to include prospective predictors of reported financial fraud victimization of older adults, and is the first to review financial exploitation of any kind with the same population from a psychological-vulnerability perspective. “This study illustrates how we can enhance our understanding of this major issue by performing a clinical analysis instead of one that stops at epidemiological or broad population-based reviews,” said Peter Lichtenberg, director of WSU’s Institute of Gerontology and lead author of the paper. “Those in the clinical study showed characteristics of extreme depression symptoms and perceived low social-status fulfillment, thus showing they were more vulnerable to the experience of theft of scams.

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2013/04/25/wayne-state-finds-psychologically-vulnerable-more-vulnerable-to-fraudsters/

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-psychological-vulnerable-older-adults-susceptible.html

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20130426/Financial-exploitation-of-the-elderly-is-on-the-rise-shows-research.aspx

http://www.examiner.com/article/financial-abuse-scams-directed-at-vulnerable-and-socially-isolated-older-adults

http://www.thirdage.com/depression/depression-and-financial-abuse

http://mms.tveyes.com/Transcript.asp?StationID=2785&DateTime=4%2F28%2F2013+10%3A57%3A01+AM&LineNumber=&MediaStationID=2785&playclip=True&RefPage=

http://www.bignewsnetwork.com/index.php/sid/214152920/scat/8a2d3b1721aaf335


Aging Network and Social Network Combine Thanks to IOG's Carrie Leach, 4/12/13


West Bloomfield Patch, 4/4/13

Former West Bloomfield Resident's Painting Featured in Art of Aging Exhibit

By Joni Hubred-Golden

Nancy Forsberg never knew she had any artistic talent at all, until she walked into an art class at Fox Run senior living community in Novi. Now her artworks line the walls of her apartment, and one was featured in last month's 14th Annual Art of Aging Successfully exhibit, held at Greater Grace Conference Center in Detroit. The March 21 event, hosted by the Wayne State University Institute of Gerontology, featured a gallery of art work from seniors all around metropolitan Detroit. Workshop topics included gardening, memory tips, exercise, nutritious cooking, and speakers from the Motown and Detroit Historical museums.


The Observer (Association of Psychological Science), 3/26/13

Former IOG Cognitive Neuroscience Trainees Profiled in Association for Psychological Science 

Drs. Kristen Kennedy and Karen Rodrigue were each featured in the latest issue of APS fielding questions about their achievements in brain aging and cognitive decline. Now assistant professors at the Center for Vital Longevity at the University of Texas, both women were mentored by the IOG's Dr. Naftali Raz as they worked toward their PhDs in cognitive neuroscience. "I was most influenced by Dr. Raz," said Dr. Rodrigue, "who thoroughly prepared me for a career in research."  Rodrigue Profile      Kennedy Profile


IOG Director Advises Documentary on Men and Aging (2/20/13)

Keith Famie's latest project, an in-depth look at how men handle aging, premiers. Dr. Peter Lichtenberg is one of the top gerontology experts interviewed in the film. (Detroit Free Press)


WDET Craig Fahle Show "Challenges Facing Wounded Vets," 2/20/13

Drs. Cathy Lysack and Mark Luborsky of Wayne State University are part of a national study looking for ways to help wounded vets re-enter society. Record numbers of soldiers return from Iraq and Afghanistan with serious spinal cord injuries. Many are left permanently disabled, and often struggle to adjust to civilian life. Cathy Lysack, professor of occupational therapy and gerontology, and Mark Luborsky, professor of anthropology and gerontology, talked about the obstacles facing disabled vets when they return from war.  Press Release              http://www.wdetfm.org/news/story/woundedstudy/


Minding Our Elders, 1/25/13

Is Alzheimer’s disease the default diagnosis for confused elders?

Alzheimer's organizations have worked diligently to raise public awareness of the disease. The downside of this awareness, however, is that even doctors can jump to possibly faulty conclusions when they see an elderly person showing signs of memory loss or significant confusion. A recent article in the Detroit Free Press features Peter Lichtenberg, head of Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology. In a paper for the journal Clinical Gerontology, Lichtenberg, according to the article, “highlighted two case studies: in one, a man's bouts of confusion and agitation in his late 70s were caused by illness and painful cellulitis, not Alzheimer's; in the other, an 87-year-old woman, who seemed suddenly confused, was suffering from depression.”     Article


John Woodard quoted in Prevention Magazine on cognitive engagement and bilingualism, 1/10/13

A new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience shows that older subjects who are in the habit of speaking two languages use less energy as they alternate between mental tasks. By using brain scans, experts were able to demonstrate not only the validity of the hypothesis, but exactly how cognitive engagement changes the brain. John Woodard, an aging expert and psychology professor from Wayne State University, said this is a stepping stone to answering the question of what's causing brain differences between older adults. The research might also assist in the development of new drugs to treat cognitive decline or age-related dementia by helping investigators understand exactly which brain regions are involved in these processes, he added.  Article


International Business Times, 1/9; MSNBC, 1/8; Science Daily, 1/5/13

Bilingual seniors stay sharp, says study

By Valli Meenakshi Ramanathan

A new study published Tuesday in the Journal of Neuroscience shows that older subjects who are in the habit of speaking two languages use less energy as they alternate between mental tasks. John Woodard, an aging expert from Wayne State University, who was not involved in the current study, stated in a news release: "This study provides some of the first evidence of an association between a particular cognitively [mentally] stimulating activity -- in this case, speaking multiple languages on a daily basis -- and brain function," according to the USNews.

http://www.ibtimes.com/bilingual-seniors-stay-sharp-says-study-1002728

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130108201519.htm


IOG aging expert quoted in MSNBC report about bilingual seniors, 1/9/13
A new study published Tuesday in the Journal of Neuroscience shows that older subjects who are in the habit of speaking two languages use less energy as they alternate between mental tasks. John Woodard, an aging expert from Wayne State University, who was not involved in the current study, stated in a news release: "This study provides some of the first evidence of an association between a particular cognitively [mentally] stimulating activity -- in this case, speaking multiple languages on a daily basis -- and brain function," according to the USNews.  Article


2012 Coverage


Eureka Alert, 11/29/2012

Study focuses on returning wounded soldiers to meaningful civilian lives

Record numbers of soldiers are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with serious spinal cord injuries (SCI). Medical advancements can help heal their physical wounds, but little is known about how these veterans re-engage with their communities and rebuild meaningful lives. "How do they transition back to family and community life? How do they adjust to their physical impairments? And how do they reconfigure their homes, their work and their lives?" asked Cathy Lysack, professor of occupational therapy and gerontology at Wayne State University. Lysack and Mark Luborsky, professor of anthropology and gerontology at Wayne State University, are co-principal investigators on a new $456,000 grant from the Department of Defense to explore those questions. The three-year grant, shared between WSU's Institute of Gerontology and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, will study how service members and veterans with SCI reintegrate into society. Luborsky believes "the time is ripe to discover how military personnel with SCI create a sense of connection." Article


Royal Oak Patch, 11/15/12 & Farmington Patch 11/27/12

American House Senior Living Communities celebrates annual Holiday Hope For Seniors

Twenty-five American House Senior Living Communities across Michigan, including Royal Oak, will celebrate the fourth annual Holiday Hope for Seniors campaign, beginning with a community-wide tree lighting ceremony on Thursday, November 29, from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. Since its inception, the Holiday Hope for Seniors program has helped more than 650 seniors in need, including 350 seniors last year alone. The campaign is run by the nonprofit organization American House Foundation. Founded in 2007, the foundation’s mission is two-fold; investing in outreach for older adults in need of assistance, and investing in research opportunities through a partnership with the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University.   Article


Detroit Free Press 10/31/12

By John Gallagher

IOG Faculty Member Dr. Gail Jensen is quoted in two editions:

Combined Beaumont, Henry Ford hospital system could enjoy greater efficiency -- Several long-term trends help explain why the merger of Henry Ford Health System and Beaumont makes sense. One is the coming implementation of the nation's new health care law, known informally as...  Article

Obama's health care plan, cost savings drive merger of Beaumont, Henry Ford    Article


Detroit Free Press, 10/14/2012

How to save money in the Medicare maze

By Robin Erb

Gail Jensen, an economics professor at Wayne State University and a researcher at its Institute of Gerontology, offers tips in this piece about the Medicare changes. Tip #1 includes shopping around, even if you’re happy with your current plan. You might be able to save money out-of-pocket while preserving your benefits. Another tip suggests that with Medicare Advantage, there is no need to buy Medigap insurance. Your medications are most likely covered, too – though not always – so there may be no reason to pay for a Medicare Part D drug plan, either. Article

 


CBS Detroit, Eureka Alert, Ann Arbor.com, Phys.org, 10/1/2012

Wayne State, UM get $2.7M federal grant to continue fight for African-American health

By Matt Roush

The Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University in partnership with the University of Michigan received a $2.7 million grant renewal from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging to continue the work of the Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research. The center is one of only seven across the country established to improve the health of older minorities through education, scholarship and research participation. This is the center’s fourth five-year renewal, which will allow it to continue its work through 2017. Peter Lichtenberg is co-director of the center’s administrative core. “For 15 years, we have partnered with older adults to promote healthier aging,” Lichtenberg said. “With this grant, we continue strengthening scholarship and focusing on the health and education needs of Detroit’s elders. It takes time to make a difference that will last.”  Press Release      Article

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2012/10/01/wayne-state-um-get-2-7m-federal-grant-to-continue-fight-for-african-american-health/

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-10/wsu--mu100112.php

http://annarbor.com/news/nih-renews-university-of-michigans-wayne-state-universitys-27m-grant-for-african-american-health-res/?cmpid=mlive-@mlive-news-a2#.UGntwK7oo40

http://phys.org/wire-news/110562617/27-million-u-m-wsu-grant-aims-to-improve-african-american-health.html


Bio-Medicine, CBS Detroit, 9/12; News-Medical.net, 9/13/2012

Wayne State University researcher recognized by American Psychological Association

The American Psychological Association's Committee on Aging recently presented its Award for the Advancement of Psychology and Aging to Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Institute of Gerontology and the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute at Wayne State University. Lichtenberg was recognized for his outstanding contributions to clinical geropsychology that integrate science, practice, education, public interest and public policy. “Dr. Lichtenberg has been instrumental in advancing Wayne State's Institute of Gerontology and enhancing its visibility in science, education and civic engagement both within Detroit and across the nation," said Hilary Ratner, vice president for research at Wayne State. "Peter is most deserving of this award for his hard work and dedication to his field."  BioMedicine Article

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2012/09/12/awards-and-certifications-from-september-12-2/

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20120913/American-Psychological-Association-honors-WSU-researcher-for-contributions-to-aging.aspx


Observer & Eccentric, 8/30/12

Brain Neurobics

A brief article noted that Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology (IOG) will host a kick-off event for the free Brain Fun & Fitness program at the Novi Senior Center on Sept. 6. The IOG will lead activities that stimulate our brains to produce more neurons and strengthen the connections between neurons.


WSU, South End 8/12/2012
WSU, MIT Professors Examine Memory Retention
By Raagini Suresh
Adults and children process newly learned information differently, according to a collaborative study between Wayne State and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Functions related to memory appeared similar between adults and children except for the area of . . .

http://thesouthend.wayne.edu/article/2012/08/wsu-mit-professors-examine-memory-retention


Farmington HillsPatch 8/28/2012
IOG Director Receives Community Recognition for Devotion to Seniors

Since Sept. 16, 1986, Farmington resident Dr. Peter Lichtenberg has devoted his career to working with his elders. Earlier this month, he received an award that recognizes a life-time of contributions to the field of psychology and aging. Lichtenberg continues to explore new ways to improve the quality of life for seniors; a project he expects to complete next year will help elders avoid losing their life savings to scams. Now head of the Wayne State University Institute of Gerontology (IOG), Lichtenberg, 53, traveled to Orlando, FL to accept the prestigious . . .  Article


Detroit Legal News, 8/20/2012
IOG's Patricia Rencher Named to Commission on Services to the Aging
Governor Rick Snyder last week announced four appointments and one reappointment to the Commission on Services to the Aging. The 15-member board advises the governor and legislature on the coordination and administration of state programs and changes to federal and state programs related to aging priorities. Among the appointees is Patricia Rencher, who serves as the community


Crain’s Detroit Business, 8/19/12
Riverfront Retirement
By Doug Henze
Presbyterian Villages of Michigan and two investors are hoping a $40 million complex that will provide affordable senior housing near the Detroit riverfront will make a splash with the city's aging population. Success could spark similar housing along the river, where at least one other developer is waiting in the wings for market demand.

The development might not draw lifelong suburban residents, but it could be a beacon to city dwellers, said Thomas Jankowski, associate director for research at the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University. Jankowski recently worked with the Michigan State Housing Development Authority on a study that surveyed Michigan residents 50 and older about housing preferences. "For people who have been living in the city for years and their houses may be one of only two or three that are occupied on their street, moving in with other people probably, in their view, leads to an increase in safety," he said.

http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20120819/FREE01/308199992/riverfront-retirement#


Jewish World Review, 8/15/12
When Alzheimer's isn't the Real Problem
By Bonnie Miller Rubin
Research from Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology is included in a story profiling people who were misdiagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Peter Lichtenberg, director of the institute and a clinical psychologist who has testified in several probate cases in which a person's mental capacity was at issue, said there is growing trend in the number of Americans being wrongfully diagnosed. In a December paper for the journal Clinical Gerontology, Lichtenberg highlighted two case studies: in one, a man's bouts of confusion and agitation in his late 70s were caused by illness and painful cellulitis, not Alzheimer's; in the other, an 87-year-old woman, who seemed suddenly confused, was suffering from depression.

http://jewishworldreview.com/0812/alzheimer_misdiagnosis.php3


Hillsdale Daily News (Hillsdale, Mich.), 8/2/12
Medicare Premium Help Reaches out to Seniors
According to a 2011 study by Wayne State University’s Seniors Count! project, one-third of the more than 60,000 seniors residing in Jackson, Lenawee and Hillsdale counties don’t have enough income to cover basic living expenses. As health care costs continue to rise, seniors need more help than ever to pay for their Medicare and prescription drug premiums.

http://www.hillsdale.net/living/x1629583182/Medicare-Premium-Help-reaches-out-to-seniors


Medical Express, Science Daily, 7/24; Psych Central, 7/25/12
Team Develops Better Understanding of Memory Retrieval Between Children and Adults

Neuroscientists from Wayne State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are taking a deeper look into how the brain mechanisms for memory retrieval differ between adults and children. While the memory systems are the same in many ways, the researchers have learned that crucial functions with relevance to learning and education differ. Noa Ofen, Ph.D., an assistant professor in WSU’s Institute of Gerontology and Department of Pediatrics, says that cognitive ability, including the ability to learn and remember new information, dramatically changes between childhood and adulthood. The team's findings were published on July 17, 2012, in the Journal of Neuroscience.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-07-team-memory-children-adults.html#jCp
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724115105.htm
http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/07/25/memory-connections-change-from-childhood-to-adulthood/42218.html


CBS Detroit, 7/18
Wayne State, MIT Team up for Memory Study of Children, Adults
By Matt Roush
Neuroscientists from Wayne State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are taking a deeper look into how the brain mechanisms for memory retrieval differ between adults and children. While the memory systems are the same in many ways, the researchers have learned that crucial functions with relevance to learning and education differ. The team’s findings were published on July 17, 2012, in the Journal of Neuroscience. According to lead author Noa Ofen, assistant professor in WSU’s Institute of Gerontology and Department of Pediatrics, cognitive ability, including the ability to learn and remember new information, dramatically changes between childhood and adulthood. This ability parallels with dramatic changes that occur in the structure and function of the brain during these periods. “Our results suggest that cortical regions related to attentional or strategic control show the greatest developmental changes for memory retrieval,” said Ofen. Ofen and her research team plan to continue research in this area, focused on modeling brain network connectivity, and applying these methods to study abnormal brain development.

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2012/07/18/wayne-state-mit-team-up-for-memory-study-of-children-adults/


Phys.org, Bio-Medicine, 7/17/12
Wayne State University Researcher's Program Targets Safer River Fishing, Anglers' Health
While Michigan environmental programs are slowly reducing toxins in lakes and rivers, human consumption of contaminated fish continues. A Wayne State University researcher believes the issue needs more attention in order to reduce human health risks. Donna Kashian, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), said the problem is especially significant in distressed urban environments, where efforts to change behaviors often confront deep-seated cultural preferences and people's own interpretation of risk. To meet those challenges, she and fellow WSU researchers Andrea Sankar, professor of anthropology, CLAS, and Mark Luborsky, director of aging and health disparities research at the Institute of Gerontology and professor of anthropology and gerontology, have undertaken what they call "Improving Community Awareness for Detroit River Fish Consumption Advisories." This health intervention program is supported by a $99,600 grant from the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

http://phys.org/wire-news/103979737/wayne-state-university-researchers-program-targets-safer-river-f.html
http://www.bio-medicine.org/biology-news-1/Wayne-State-University-researchers-program-targets-safer-river-fishing--anglers-health-25875-1/


Wisconsin Public Radio (NPR), 6/21/12
Mental Exercises Might Be Key to Better Brain Function
Cheryl Deep, Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology, was a guest on NPR’s Joy Cardin show discussing Brain Neurobics. Research suggests that certain types of mental exercises might help our brain maintain concentration, memory and visual and spatial skills over the years. Deep conducts "Brain Neurobics" sessions for the institute.

http://wpr.org/wcast/download-mp3-request.cfm?mp3file=jca120621a.mp3&iNoteID=155948


Detroit Free Press, USA Today, Black Christian News, 6/10/12

Flipping the script on mundane habits can boost brain productivity

By Robin Erb

Research suggests that certain types of mental exercises -- whether they are memory games on your mobile device or jotting down letters backward -- might help our brain maintain concentration, memory and visual and spatial skills over the years. At a recent "Brain Neurobics" session at the Waltonwood Senior Living center in Novi, Cheryl Deep of Wayne State’s Institute of Gerontology, encouraged several dozen senior citizens to flip the pictures in their homes upside-down. It might baffle houseguests, but the exercise crowbars the brain out of familiar grooves cut deep by years of mindless habit. "Every time you walk past and look, your brain has to rotate that image," Deep said. "Brain neurobics is about getting us out of those ruts, those pathways, and shaking things up." Assistant professor of pediatrics Moriah Thomason, a scientific adviser to www.Lumosity.com, one of the fastest-growing brain game websites, is a proponent of mental workouts. "We used to think that what you're born with is what you have through life. But now we understand that the brain is a lot more plastic and flexible than we ever appreciated," she said. Photos from the event are included. Full Article

http://www.freep.com/article/20120610/FEATURES08/206100314/Flipping-script-mundane-habits-can-boost-brain-productivity

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-06-10/mental-exercises-brain-health/55497440/1

http://www.blackchristiannews.com/news/2012/06/mental-games-may-help-brains-function-better.html

 


Detroit Free Press, 5/17/12
Diagnosis of Alzheimer's isn't Always Accurate
By Robin Erb
Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology worries about a growing trend in the number of Americans being wrongfully assumed -- even medically misdiagnosed -- with Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia and perhaps the most feared disease of old age. "It's a real problem. If you're older and you get a label of Alzheimer's -- even a hint that you have Alzheimer's -- there's no more critical thinking about it. You're written off by a lot of people," said Peter Lichtenberg, head of the institute and a clinical psychologist who has testified in several probate cases in which a person's mental capacity was at issue. Lichtenberg said his concerns about misdiagnosis in no way lessen the enormity of Alzheimer's impact. "I don't know how vast a problem it is, but I see it too often," Lichtenberg said.

http://www.freep.com/article/20120517/NEWS06/205170720/Diagnosis-of-Alzheimer-s-isn-t-always-accurate

CBS Detroit, Science Codex, 5/9/12
Wayne State: Genes, Vascular Risk Modify Effects of Aging on Brain, Cognition
Efforts to understand how the aging process affects the brain and cognition have expanded beyond simply comparing younger and older adults. “Everybody ages differently. By looking at genetic variations and individual differences in markers of vascular health, we begin to understand that preventable factors may affect our chances for successful aging,” said Wayne State University psychology doctoral student Andrew Bender, lead author of a study supported by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health and now in press in the journal Neuropsychologia. The study focuses on carriers of the e4 variant of the apolipoprotein (APOE) gene, present in roughly 25 percent of the population. Compared to those who possess other forms of the APOE gene, carriers of the e4 allele are at significantly greater risk for Alzheimer’s, dementia and cardiovascular disease. The research project, led by Naftali Raz, professor of psychology and director of the Lifespan Cognitive Neuroscience Research Program at WSU’s Institute of Gerontology, tested different cognitive abilities known for their sensitivity to aging and the effects of the APOE e4 variant.

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2012/05/09/wayne-state-genes-vascular-risk-modify-effects-of-aging-on-brain-cognition/
http://www.sciencecodex.com/wsu_researchers_say_genes_and_vascular_risk_modify_effects_of_aging_on_brain_and_cognition-91231


Grosse Pointe Today, 5/7/12
Brain isn't a Muscle, But Improves with work: So Just Do It

By Anne Marie Gattari
A two-part series on “How the Brain Ages,” with researchers from Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology (IOG), offered interactive brain exercises and gave the audience practical information on how to give their brain a daily workout. One of the easiest and most beneficial exercises you can do is to simply switch hands to do daily activities like eating, buttoning a shirt, brushing your teeth and so on. Cheryl Deep of WSU’s IOG calls it “the magic of non-dominance.” Using your non-dominant hand to do simple tasks stimulates the neurons in your brain. “It’s like building muscle,” she says. “If you don’t force yourself to work harder, you will never get stronger. It’s the same thing with the brain.”

http://grossepointetoday.com/gp-fyi/aging-america/002805-brain-isnt-muscle-improves-work-so-just-do-it


Detroit News, 3/22/12
Wayne State Challenges Stereotypes With 'Art of Aging'
By Kim Kozlowski
Now in its 13th year, the Art of Aging Successfully was held at the Greater Grace Conference Center in Detroit attracting 500 people. Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Wayne State University Institute of Gerontology, founded and organized the conference as a way to celebrate older adults. "We don't get into health, we focus on wellness," said Lichtenberg. "We don't get into problems, we focus on achievements and aspirations. There are so many negative beliefs about aging and older adults. … We're here to show people that's not the case." The day featured several speakers, vendors offering services and many displays of artwork. It also featured several small group sessions for participants, including art therapy, brain "neurobics" and an exercise class. Photos of the conference are included.

http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20120323/METRO/203230371/1005/rss32


Grosse Pointe Today, 3/12/12
'Aging Well in America' Takes a Televised Look at Elder Issues
By Anne Marie Gattari
An article recaps a recent episode of “Aging Well in America” on WMTV, Grosse Pointe’s cable channel, which examines the country’s aging population. Cathy Lysack of Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology was a guest on the premiere show to talk about her research on “downsizing” – the phenomenon of elderly moving from their long-time residents to smaller, different locations. The show airs the first and third week of every month, Monday-Sunday, at 5:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 6 p.m.

http://grossepointetoday.com/gp-fyi/aging-america/002683-aging-well-america-takes-televised-look-elder-issues


Detroit Free Press, 3/5/12
Ron Dzwonkowski: What's Michigan Doing for its Fastest-Growing Population?
By Ron Dzwonkowski
Ron Dzwonkowski, associate editor of the Free Press, discusses Michigan’s seniors who comprise the fastest growing segment of population in the state. Though Michigan's birthrate has been on a downslide since 1960, its over-50 population has been exploding. From 2000-10, the number of state residents ages 60-64 jumped almost 51percent. "Somebody starting up a business here who ignores the realities of the population does so at their own peril," said Tom Jankowski, associate director of Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology. "They are among the most aware, because they read, and active reading is the best way to learn about anything," he said. "They also are the most connected to their communities; they volunteer more, belong to service clubs. They understand and they care more -- and not just about themselves, but about what the future holds for younger people." However, a study released last summer by the Gerontology Institute's Seniors Count! Project shows a third of the state's over-65 population survives on an income too low to meet basic needs.

http://www.freep.com/article/20120304/COL32/203040486/Ron-Dzwonkowski-What-s-Michigan-doing-for-its-fastest-growing-population-?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CFRONTPAGE%7Cs


Science Daily, Health Care Weekly Review, e! Science News, 2/6/12
Strategy shift with age can lead to navigational difficulties
A Wayne State University researcher believes studying people's ability to find their way around may help explain why loss of mental capacity occurs with age. Scott Moffat, associate professor of psychology and gerontology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Institute of Gerontology at WSU, said studies have demonstrated reliable differences in navigation and spatial learning tasks based on age. Younger adults tend to outperform their elders in spatial navigation, Moffat said, and people seem to start switching navigational strategies with age. Generally speaking, he said, younger subjects tend to use an allocentric, or map-based, strategy, in which they conceive what an entire environment looks like and where they are in it. Older ones prefer an egocentric, or route-based, strategy, using a series of steps to be taken to reach a destination.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120206092628.htm
http://www.hcwreview.com/strategy-shift-with-age-can-lead-to-navigational-difficulties-wayne-state-university-researcher-finds/
http://esciencenews.com/articles/2012/02/06/wayne.state.study.finds.strategy.shift.with.age.can.lead.navigational.difficulties


2011 Coverage


Grosse Pointe Today, 12/19/11
Be Aware of Special Vulnerability of Elderly to Scammers and Thieves
By Anne Marie Gattari
Some 13 percent of older African-American residents of Metro Detroit report they have been the victim of a scam or a theft in the past year while the national average is just 3 percent, according to new research from Wayne State’s Institute of Gerontology (IOG). Dr. Peter Lichtenberg, the IOG’s director, just finished crunching the numbers and the results are dramatic – but not surprising, he said. “Three-quarters of those interviewed said they underestimated how much they’d need in retirement,” he said. “And the best victims of fraud are those that are stressed about their finances.” Add that to the fact that the elderly tend to be less critical and more accepting, they are the perfect victim, Lichtenberg said. That’s why, he said, “everyone needs to be on guard, but some more than others.”

http://grossepointetoday.com/gp-fyi/aging-america/002477-be-aware-special-vulnerabilityof-elderly-scammers-and-thieves


Detroit Free Press, 12/11/11
Loving Work After Age 90
By Zlati Meyer
Numerous studies have shown that staying on the job later in life has numerous advantages, such as decreased dementia, longer lifespan and greater happiness, according to Cathy Lysack, deputy director of Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology, whose almost-80-year-old father is a full-time surgeon. "There's a small portion of older adults who are amazingly great at what they do. They have the abilities to perform at a very high level in late life, and it's meaningful for them to work. They're still rewarded," she said.

http://www.freep.com/article/20111211/BUSINESS06/112110415/Loving-work-after-age-90


ACCESS, Winter 2011-12
Understanding Delirium
Peter Lichtenberg, geriatric neuropsychologist and director of the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University, is quoted in a story on delirium, an under-diagnosed and under-treated problem causing dangerous health problems for older adults and distress among their caregivers.

http://www.aaa1b.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Access-Winter-12-final.pdf (story runs on pg. 4)


The Guardian (UK), 12/1/2011
The Future of Growing old in America
By James Ridgeway
A Wayne State University study is referenced in a story about the challenges facing the elderly. WSU researchers presented a study during the annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America which was published earlier this year. The study, titled "Invisible Poverty," found that one in three elders – including many living in middle-class suburbs – cannot fully cover their basic living expenses, including food, housing, transportation and medical care. It also found that certain shortcomings in the way federal poverty statistics are compiled meant that poverty among older people was more likely to be underestimated. "This widespread economic struggle faced by Michigan seniors is fairly hidden from public sight, making it an invisible poverty that takes its toll on older individuals, their families and caregivers and the community at large," says the study.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/dec/01/future-growing-old-america?newsfeed=true


WWJ-AM, 10/30/11
Risk factors for Alzheimer’s

Peter Lichtenberg, psychology professor and director of Wayne State’s Institute of Gerontology, discussed the risk factors for Alzheimer’s. Lichtenberg examined what role environment and genetics may play in the disease’s development.
http://mms.tveyes.com/Transcript.asp?StationID=2785&DateTime=10%2F30%2F2011+9%3A45%3A18+PM&LineNumber=&MediaStationID=2785&playclip=True&RefPage=


Macomb Daily, Daily Tribune, 10/17/11
Aging America Blog: Moving Mom, or Not

By Anne Marie Gattari
Cathy Lysack, a researcher at Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology, spent much of this year sitting in the living rooms of Detroit's elderly listening to their stories as they prepared to move out of their long-time homes into smaller, more manageable, quarters. She will be presenting her findings at a free event, 4:30 p.m., on Thursday, Oct. 20, at the Grosse Pointe War Memorial. "What makes downsizing in late life unique is that it could be their last move," Lysack says. "Thinking about it in this way brings the distant horizon of their end of life closer into view and they ask: 'How much future do I have, and do I want to have it in a new place?'"

http://www.macombdaily.com/articles/2011/10/17/lifestyles/doc4e9c46db16cd5488423473.txt?viewmode=fullstory
http://www.dailytribune.com/articles/2011/10/17/news/doc4e9c4b149e8cb670760722.txt?viewmode=fullstory


WWJ-AM, 9/15/11
FOCIS Retirement Seminars

WWJ reporter Marie Osborne provided on-site coverage yesterday of the “Retirement in Transition: Work, Relax or Reboot?” presentations at Wayne State University’s Community Arts Auditorium. Dr. Peter Lichtenberg was a panel member.

http://mms.tveyes.com/Transcript.asp?StationID=2785&DateTime=9%2F15%2F2011+11%3A14%3A10+PM&LineNumber=&MediaStationID=2785&playclip=True&RefPage=


A Healthier Michigan, 9/8/11
9 Detroit-area Retailers, Attractions that Offer Senior Citizen Discounts

By Andreya Davis
According to the online legal dictionary, “People are said to be senior citizens when they reach the age of sixty or sixty-five because those are the ages at which most people retire from the workforce.” Approximately 128,000 Detroit citizens alone are 65 and older; unfortunately a Wayne State University study suggests that one in three Michigan seniors live at or below a basic level of economic security.

http://www.ahealthiermichigan.org/2011/09/08/9-detroit-area-retailers-attractions-that-offer-senior-citizen-discounts/


Kansas City Star, Herald Online (Rock Hill, S.C.), Wellness.com, 7/26/11
Minorities Lag in Mental Health Treatment, But Some are Working to Change That

By Cassandra Spratling
For African Americans, 14 percent of those diagnosed with depression received the acceptable standard of care; for Mexican Americans, it was 12 percent, according to a National Institute of Mental Health study published last year. The study showed that only about half of Americans diagnosed with major depression in a given year are treated, and only one in five of those get treatment consistent with American Psychiatric Association guidelines. African Americans and Mexican Americans had the lowest rates of those getting the care they need. “First and foremost, identifying the problem is the big challenge," Wayne State University professor and clinical psychologist Hector Gonzales told the Detroit Free Press on July 16. Gonzales, the lead author on the study, went on to say, "Some cultures, particularly a lot of people in the black community, are not open or receptive to admitting to mental health problems. People end up acting out their mental health issues in ways that are destructive to themselves and others."

http://www.kansascity.com/2011/07/26/3037182_minorities-lag-in-mental-health.html
http://www.heraldonline.com/2011/07/26/3246000/minorities-lag-in-mental-health.html#ixzz1TJKSenEx
http://www.wellness.com/newsfeed.asp?id=20110726/20110726MinoritiesLaginMentalHealthTreatmentButSomeAreWorkingtoChangeThat.xml&storyId=22954672



Detroit Free Press, 7/21; WLNS-TV (Lansing), WSYM-TV (Lansing), Physorg.com, WJR.com, First Science, 7/20/11
Michigan Senior Citizens Struggling Economically, Report Says
By Robin Erb
A new study concludes that one-third of Michigan's senior citizens are considered "economically insecure," far more than suggested by the federal poverty line.
Even in some of the wealthiest counties, where suburbs buoy the county's overall median income, at least 1 in 4 senior citizens struggles to make ends meet, according to the paper, "Invisible Poverty: New Measure Unveils Financial Hardship in Michigan's Older Population." "There's the popular perception that they have this nice car and their house is paid off and they travel the country. And that's true for some," said Thomas Jankowski, one of the study's authors and associate research director at Wayne State University's Institute of Gerontology. "But others, many, many others, just skate on the edge of economic security."

http://www.freep.com/article/20110721/NEWS06/107210485/Michigan-senior-citizens-struggling-economically-report-says
http://www.wlns.com/story/15118514/less-funding-leaves-elderly-struggling
http://mms.tveyes.com/Transcript.asp?StationID=4400&DateTime=7%2F20%2F2011+5%3A37%3A11+PM&LineNumber=&MediaStationID=4400&playclip=True&RefPage=
http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-07-michigan-seniors-basics.html
http://www.wjr.com/rssItem.asp?feedid=123&itemid=29696236
http://www.firstscience.com/home/news/breaking-news-all-topics/1-in-3-michigan-seniors-can-t-afford-basics-wayne-state-university-study-says_109889.html

 


Daily Tribune, 7/1/11
SAVE honors key people in fight against elder abuse

By Jeanne Towar
An article highlights the Oakland County SAVE Task Force’s first Courage Awards, held June 22, to honor individuals and organizations that have taken action to prevent the abuse and exploitation of vulnerable adults. Keynote speaker Peter Lichtenberg, director of the Wayne State Institute of Gerontology and a national expert on senior issues, described financial fraud as the second highest cause of abuse against seniors. Financial fraud ranges from promises of wealth to political and religious scams.

http://www.dailytribune.com/articles/2011/06/30/news/doc4e0c042041a9c366668460.txt?viewmode=fullstory

Naples Daily News (Naples, Fla.), 6/20/11
Sage Advice for Seniors: Older Adults and Transitions

By Lee Blanchard
The issue of older adults downsizing their possessions to move into a senior living community is the focus of this story, and an ongoing Wayne State University and University of Kansas study titled Household Moves Project. Researchers are trying to determine why downsizing is so difficult for seniors.

http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2011/jun/20/sage-advice-seniors-older-adults-and-transitions/


Detroit Free Press, 6/19/11
As weather warms, watch out for home repair scams

By Tammy Stables Battaglia
Wayne State University professor Peter Lichtenberg, who studies elder abuse, commented in a story on repair scams and thieves that usually prey on seniors who have little money and those who feel disrespected. His 2010 study found that 1 in 10 senior citizens in Detroit have been victimized by fraud.

http://www.freep.com/article/20110619/NEWS05/106190479/As-weather-warms-watch-out-home-repair-scams


AOL News, 10/13/11
It's a Good Bet you'll Find More Elders in the Casinos

By Robert W. Stock
Peter Lichtenberg, director of Wayne State’s >Institute of Gerontology, comments in a story >examining the gaming industry’s dependence on >the elderly during times of economic recession.

http://www.aolnews.com/nation/article/its-a-good-bet-youll-find-more-elders-in-the-casinos/19671012


Aging Well with Cathy Lysack

(October 27, 2011, 26: 58 minute clip, mp3 format)

Deputy Director Dr. Cathy Lysack talks with Bob Allison about new research by IOG student trainees on Aging and Function.

 


New health workshops (held by the HBEC) on cancer and men-only topics

(September 2011, 0:23:50 minute clip, mp3 format)

Our Community Education Coordinator, Pat Rencher, talks to Bob Allison about fascinating new health workshops on cancer and men-only topics.


Invisible Poverty

(August 2011, 0:19:00 minute clip, mp3 format)

 Associate Director of Research Tom Jankowski talks to radio host Tony Trupiano (AM 1310) about the economic struggles of Michigan's older adults.


Minorities lag in mental health treatment, but some are working to change that

(July 2011, online)

 Wayne State University professor and clinical psychologist Hector Gonzalez told the Detroit Free Press on July 16. Gonzalez, the lead author on the study, went on to say, "Some cultures, particularly a lot of people in the black community, are not open or receptive to admitting to mental health problems. People end up acting out their mental health issues in ways that are destructive to themselves and others."


Is it realistic to expect the elderly to survive on social security alone?
(July 2011, online)

Thomas Jankowski, associate director of research at the Institute of Gerontology and the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute at Wayne State University, spoke with Craig Fahle about the Elder Security Index from Elder Law of Michigan. Jankowski discussed the economic security of people 65 years of age and older in the region and the rate of poverty among seniors in rural and urban areas.


Michigan senior citizens struggling economically, report says
(July 2011, online)

At least 1 in 4 senior citizens struggles to make ends meet, according to the paper by lead author Thomas Jankowski, "Invisible Poverty: New Measure Unveils Financial Hardship in Michigan's Older Population."


Study: Third of Lansing-area seniors are struggling financially

(July 2011, online)

Researchers at Wayne State University have found that more than one-third of Michigan's senior citizens are struggling to pay for food, housing, transportation and medical care they need.


WSU study: Spinal cord injury sufferers express positive view of their health
(July 2011, online)

Researchers at Wayne State University have found that adults with spinal cord injuries do not correlate the severity of their injuries with overall health.


What's New with Healthier Black Elders?

(May 2011, 0:28:13 minute clip, mp3 format)

Outreach Coordinator Karen Daniels explains the mission of the Healthier Black Elders Center, new programs and the needs of our community.


Aging In Oakland

(January 2011, pdf format)

IOG Director Peter Lichtenberg is quoted extensively in this detailed article from January's Downtown Birmingham & Bloomfield Magazine.


Do Different Races Receive Different Medical Care?

(February 2011, 0:27:46 minute clip, mp3 format)

Elham Mahmoudi, a Ph.D. candidate at the IOG, discusses the differences between racial and ethnic groups in their access to medical care.  Older African Americans and Hispanics showed less access to physician care than Caucasians over the seven-year span of her research.


 

2010 Coverage


Smart Computer Use

(January 2010, 0:27:34 minute clip, mp3 format)

Nearly half of all persons age 65 and older now use computers.  Dr. Cresci has taught computer skills to hundreds of inner-city seniors to help them access medical information, increase social interaction and keep their information safe online. Learn her valuable tips to use computers with ease and wisdom.


Invisible Depression

(December 2010, 0:29:35 minute clip, mp3 format)

Depression in older adults is a serious problem often hidden from loved ones because symptoms can be confused with other ailments. Learn what depression looks like in older adults, medications and illnesses that can cause it, and tips for relieving it. (Interview with IOG spokesperson Cheryl Deep)


Seniors Victimized by Fraud

(December 2010, 0:19:59 minute clip, mp3 format)

IOG Director Peter Lichtenberg discusses why seniors fall prey to con artists; downsizing problems for Michigan's older adults who are "rusting in place," financial gerontology and latest research from the Gerontological Society of America.


WWJ, 11/14
(November 2010, online)

Peter Lichtenberg, psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience professor and director of Wayne State’s Institute of Gerontology, comments about local seniors who reported being scammed during the last year.


Ready for Tomorrow? Seniors Count! Can Help

(November 2010, pdf format)

Seniors Count! is profiling older adults throughout southeast Michigan to find out who they are and what services they need.  This joint project between the IOG and Adult Well-Being Services has posted its first results on the new website:  www.seniorscount.org.  Learn more about this critical database and future project goals.


Link to loneliness found as senior fraud runs rampant
(November 2010, online)

An excellent article about seniors being victimized by fraud appeared on the front page of today's Free Press.  The article was inspired by Director Peter Lichtenberg's research into the circumstances, personalities and emotional status of seniors that leave them vulnerable to fraud and scams.   We're especially pleased with the accurate and thorough reporting of these important results.


When Grandma is Mom
 (October 2010, online)

Read about Detroit's grandparents who are bravely raising their grandchildren when their children cannot.  Lifespan research done at the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute and the Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State is cited in the article.


 It's a Good Bet You'll Find Lots of Elders in Casinos
 (October 2010, online)

The column notes the potential problems when older adults become fixated on gambling as a way to stave off loneliness and add excitement to their lives. Mr. Stock writes about aging issues, so expect to see more information from the Institute of Gerontology in his articles in the future.


 Bringing more balance to your life

(September 2010, 0:27:46 minute clip, mp3 format)

Dr. Allon Goldberg, faculty fellow at the IOG, gives tips for older adults on how to maintain balance skills and spot problems that could lead to a fall.  Find out who is at risk and where to get help.   Want to learn more about research on balance skills in older adults?  Call Dr. Goldberg at 313-577-8608.


Grandparenting

(July 2010, 0:27:45 minute clip, mp3 format)

Lisa Ficker, Ph.D., discusses the growing number of grandparents who are parenting or co-parenting their grandchildren.  The number of grandparents raising grandchildren in Detroit has increased from about 17,086 in 1990 to almost 27,000 in 2000.  An additional rise is expected in the latest census numbers.  What are the benefits and potential problems when older adults raise young children?


New Educational Seminars in Aging

(June 2010, 0:28:22 minute clip, mp3 format)

Terri Bailey describes the IOG's new Crossing Borders CE training on October 27 and the Be Assured, Your Insured  seminar on Nov. 6.  Crossing Borders brings financial planners, elder law attorneys, nurses, social workers, caregivers, and administrators together to understand the multiple aspects of care needed when older adults face major physical or cognitive changes.   Be Assured, Your Insured offers "one-stop shopping" for information direct from insurers about health care coverage and health reform during this critical open enrollment period.  To learn more, call the IOG at 313-577-2297.


The Keys to Extreme Aging

(May 2010, 0:27:17 minute clip, mp3 format)

Dr. John Woodard, this year's faculty fellow at the Institute of Gerontology, discusses living to 100.  He is a researcher with the Georgia Centenarian study working with about 244 persons age 98 to 108 to learn the important factors for a long, productive life.  Alzheimer's and dementia are not inevitable, and attitude definitely matters.  Click here for the complete interview.


Wayne State Study: Childhood Economics Linked To Later Life Disability

(May 2010, online)

Having parents with a low level of education or an absent or deceased father during childhood may raise a person's risk for being disabled later in life, a recent study by two Wayne State researchers suggests. Principal investigator Mary Bowen, former National Institute on Aging postdoctoral research fellow at WSU and current resident of Tampa, Fla., and co-author Hector González, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Institute of Gerontology and the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences in WSU’s School of Medicine, were published in the American Journal of Public Health for their study examining early childhood economic conditions and risk for disability in older adulthood.


Participant Resource Pool

(April 2010, 0:29:36 minute clip, mp3 format)

This Aging Well segment discusses the need for African Americans to volunteer for research.  Patricia Rencher, the IOG's coordinator of research volunteers, talks about our Participant Resource Pool database of older African American adults who are willing to consider participating in research projects.  The database always needs volunteers, so please call 313-577-2297, ext. 351, and ask for Pat to learn how you can help.


Healthier Black Elders Center (HBEC)

(March 2010, 19:33 minute clip, mp3 format)

Dr. Carmen Green, HBEC Director talks about the HBEC and its 2010 8th annual health reception on the Aging Well Radio Show hosted by Bob Allison.


Olivia Washington: What's Next

(February 2010, 29:02 minute clip, mp3 format)

Dr. Olivia Washington, talks about what she is doing now that she is retrired on the Aging Well Radio Show.


The Pain Gap - Pain Management Disparities by race, gender

(February 2010, online)

Pain—100 million Americans say they live with it, it is the leading cause of disability and it is still misunderstood by the medical establishment, especially in women and minorities.


Overview of 2010 Programs

(January 2010, 28:25 minute clip, mp3 format)

Cheryl Deep gives gives an overview of upcoming programs in 2010 on the Aging Well Radio Show hosted by Bob Allison.


Depression Largely Going Untreated

(January 2010, online)

More than one in ten people in the U.S. suffer from major depression, yet most of them aren't getting appropriate treatment for the disease.


Wayne State, UM Study: Few Depressed Get Full Care

(January 2010, online)

Only about half of Americans diagnosed with major depression in a given year receive treatment for it and even fewer -- about one-fifth -- receive treatment consistent with current practice guidelines, according to data from national surveys supported by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health.


Americans With Depression Are Undertreated

(January 2010, online)

Mexican-Americans, Caribbean blacks, and African-Americans with depression were half as likely as others to receive any type of depression treatment or the recommended care.


Depressing News About Depression

(January 2010, online)

Depression is one of the most widespread disabilities in the United States, but the vast majority of depressed adults aren't getting proper treatment for it, according to a new studay.


Mental Ills Are Often Overtreated and Undertreated 

(January 2010, online)

In national surveys of more than 15,000 adults, researchers found that 8.3% met the diagnostic criteria for major depression during the previous year. About half those diagnosed received some form of treatment for depression, but less than a quarter were treated using strategies considered effective and used in accordance with American Psychiatric Association practice guidelines, one study found.


Depression Treatment Lacking for Many People

(January 2010, online)

Treatment for major depression is abysmal, according to a study published today in the Archives of General Psychiatry. In a national survey of 15,762 people, it found that only half of all people with depression received treatment.


Half of Depressed Americans Get No Treatment

(January 2010, online)

About half of Americans with major depression do not receive treatment for the condition, and in many cases the therapies are not consistent with the standard of care, according to a new study.


The Wrong Story About Depression

(January 2010, online)

A study led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania indicating that the antidepressants Paxil and imipramine work no better than placebos (“than sugar pills,” said CNN) for people with mild to moderate depression.


Mental Health - Deficiencies in Treatment of Depression

(January 2010, online)

Researchers reported last week that antidepressant drugs seemed to be effective mainly in people with severe depression, not those with milder forms. Now another study is reporting that only about half of all Americans with depression receive treatment of any kind.


Most Depressed Adults Going Without Treatment

(January 2010, online)

Mexican Americans most likely to get no treatment or be undertreated, study finds. Dr. Hector Gonzalez, WSU School of Medicine Assistant Professor is quoted in BusinessWeek.